How to Reform Election Laws

The brouhaha about recent changes in Georgia’s election laws is all about Democrats trying to make it easier for Democrat-leaning voters to vote. If Democrat politicians have their way, not only would D.C. and Puerto Rico become States, thus making it almost impossible for a Republican to be elected president (as long as the Electoral College remains in place), but also: the voting age would be lowered to 16 (14?, 12?); ballots would be mailed to everyone old enough to vote and could completed, collected, and turned in by anyone; online voting (easily corrupted) would be allowed; and anyone who happens to be in the country at election time would be entitled to vote.

All of that, and whatever else Democrats hope to do to secure permanent control of the central government, goes in exactly the wrong direction. Voting should be severely restricted, not opened up. Specifically, voting should be restricted to mature and responsible and who have “skin in the game”. Here is how it should work:

There would be one vote per household — irrespective of the sex of the head of the household (if I may use that quaint term) — inasmuch as a household is an economic and social unit.

The household must include at least one person who is 30 years of age or older, and one such person must cast the household’s ballot on election day (see below).

No member of the household may have demonstrated grossly irresponsible behavior, as indicated by a conviction for a felony.

There may not be an outstanding tax lien against property held by any member of the household.

At least one member of the household must hold a deed to real property with an assessed value of at least $50,000 (to be adjusted upward for inflation), and any outstanding debt secured by the property must not exceed 80 percent of the purchase price of the property.

At least one member of the household who is 30 years old or older must not be receiving unemployment benefits or must not have received them within six months before election day.

Every member of the household who is 21 years old or older must be a citizen of the United States or a legal, resident alien.

To ensure the integrity of ballots and the casting thereof on the basis of up-to-date knowledge of the candidates and the issues, all voting would occur in-person, on election day, at polling stations in numbers and locations adequate to avoid long lines at closing time. Each person casting a ballot for a household would have to produce the household’s government-issued voter-registration card and an approved form of identification (e.g., government-issued driver’s license, military ID card).

There would thus be no need for absentee voting, except in cases where an entire household is disabled (e.g., a household consisting of one or two elderly persons), as certified by a licensed physician, or stationed overseas. (Other households would have to plan vacations so that one qualified member can cast an in-person vote on election day.)

Election day would be shifted to a Saturday. All polling stations in the country would be open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., local time. No votes, including absentee ballots, would be counted before the last stations close (i.e., the polling stations in Hawaii).