V-J Day Stirs Memories

V-J Day in the United States commemorates the official surrender of Japan to the Allied Forces, and the end of World War II. The surrender ceremony took place on September 2, 1945 (the date in Japan), beginning at 9:00 a.m. Tokyo time. The ceremony was held in Tokyo Bay, aboard U.S.S. Missouri, and was presided over by General Douglas MacArthur:

Though it was actually September 1 in the United States at the time of the ceremony, V-J Day is traditionally observed in the U.S. on September 2.

The Monday after the surrender was Labor Day in the U.S. And in those more civilized times (barbarous wars aside), school began on the day after Labor Day.

On September 4, 1945 (the day after Labor Day), I entered kindergarten at the age of 4-2/3 years. Here’s the school that I attended:

PolkSch

In those innocent days, students got to school and back home by walking. Here’s the route that I followed as a kindergartener:

Route to Polk School

A 4-year-old walking several blocks between home and school, usually alone most of the way? Unheard of today, it seems. But that was a different time, in many ways.

For more, see “The Passing of Red-Brick Schoolhouses and a Way of Life“.

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